In our wellness space today, there is so much discussion surrounding behavior change and how habits are such a driving force for many of us. The endgame of wellness programs should be focused on always shaping the individual to get better, do better, and feel better.

The wellness umbrella is so large and there are so many options popping up and pivoting every day which makes it difficult to decide on the right fit. So, when it comes time for vendor and program selection, the assessment tends to become binary – is it going to cost us an arm and a leg and will it even move the needle?

The good news is that today you don’t have to choose between the two.

Employee Engagement or Corporate Wellness: You Shouldn't Have to Choose

 

Finding the Balance

The wellness space has come a long way in terms of acceptance and useful tools available. Unfortunately, the reluctance surrounding which solutions to go with has only become more overwhelming. We know that individuals can have poor habits and the same can be said for organizations when it comes to program implementation, which is often due to groupthink and inaccurate assessments of employee needs and wants.  Therein lies one of the biggest challenges facing today’s decision makers: if we get into the habit as an organization of always saying that ‘one day’ we will get there, then we will be perpetually stuck in providing subpar solutions.

The carrot or the stick example gets brought up constantly. Will fear of punishment be a bigger driver than the reward of accomplishment? Will this program drain our resources?

The requests have to be reasonable on both sides – companies set out to be fiscally responsible and individuals should be given every opportunity to live their best life.

Peerfit has found that balance of making the end user incredibly happy while keeping them on pace with their current wellness journey while making those responsible for implementing the program look like rockstars. The manual tracking, the frustration of having to find new fitness vendors to match employee needs and unclear comparison to move the needle, disappear.

 

How to Place Solutions That Resonate

Ease of use and satisfaction of the product leads to more buy-in. Make sure there are clear communication channels surrounding the product, implementation, and opportunities to succeed.

We need to shift our thinking from the typical relationship between the carrot and the stick. Peers can provide constructive social pressure where the carrot can be the intrinsic desire for connectedness with others. On the flip side, peers can also be the stick towards a friend or co-worker with built-in accountability to join them in wellness activities. The social pressure ends up being a win, win scenario that naturally places the emphasis to drive behavior where needed.

As a vendor with a B2B2C model, we understand that our end-user experience is important to driving behavior change. We looked at our user base as individual consumers first, then designed our Enterprise Health programs with efficiency in mind. We even started a #morethanfitness campaign to hear about our team’s why. The responses ranged from providing more mental clarity and balance to the gratitude we receive from happy customers.

 

Not All Solutions Are Taxing on Resources

A solution could cost a little bit of money but add burdensome admin work. Or, it could be accessed at a premium rate and not even come close to moving the needle. This is intimidating because there is pressure to get it right and to look deeply at the numbers. The issue is that the dollar signs are generally the biggest deterrent.

Bottom line: it is no longer a binary comparison; you are able to gain traction with a strong user experience and still be fiscally responsible. The key is realizing that there are thresholds to reach with wellness investment. Too little and it won’t have an impact, over the top and you bet the CFO will be curious about the impact that the ten new TVs in the onsite gym had on employee wellbeing. Value comes in movement and change in the right direction.

Author

Andre Ortega is Chief of Staff for Enterprise Health at Peerfit. After earning a B.S. in Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, Fitness and Wellness from the University of Florida, Andre began his career as a Wellness Director in the Tampa Bay area. He can frequently be found doing inversions at Bella Prana Yoga & Meditation and sweating profusely at Viking Fitness bootcamps.

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